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Safety & DSE spectacles

PROTECTING YOUR EYES

Walters Opticians are qualified to supply and fit both safety eyewear and DSE user eyewear.

We can either dispense and supply, or provide a dispense only service through your employers chosen contracted supplier. Below are basic facts about eye protection you may find informative and useful.

Terminology

The term Safety Spectacle refers to an optical device which provides protection against impact, chemical or molten metal splashes, dust, or radiation from welding arcs or lasers.They may take the form of spectacles, goggles, visors, face shields or hoods.

The current standard for safety spectacles, goggles, and face shields is EN 166. The standard also has different sub-classes as well as specific standards for welding,Ultra violet filters,welding filters etc.

While sometimes it the standards and the classifications of safety spectacles may seem complex, you should always choose and wear eye protection appropriate to the hazard and ensure that it fits properly and is comfortable.

1) SAFETY SPECTACLES

Safety spectacles normally incorporate sideshields and are suitable for general workshop or laboratory use when protection against impact or occasional light chemical splash is required. They may be fitted with prescription lenses: where these are required at work, it is often the case that then the cost of an eye test and the cost of the spectacles must be borne by the employer.

Eyeshields (overspecs) are similar to safety spectacles, but they may be worn over ordinary prescription spectacles. They are particularly suitable for occasional use; either by visitors, or by spectacle wearers, but their optical quality is generally not good enough for prolonged use.

Although safety spectacles are commonly worn in laboratories and their use is strongly encouraged, they are not sealed to the face and so are not appropriate where there is a serious risk of eye injury from toxic or corrosive chemicals or from cryogens (e.g. where large volumes may be splashed onto the head and run down into the eyes).

1) SAFETY SPECTACLES

Safety spectacles normally incorporate sideshields and are suitable for general workshop or laboratory use when protection against impact or occasional light chemical splash is required. They may be fitted with prescription lenses: where these are required at work, it is often the case that then the cost of an eye test and the cost of the spectacles must be borne by the employer.

Eyeshields (overspecs) are similar to safety spectacles, but they may be worn over ordinary prescription spectacles. They are particularly suitable for occasional use; either by visitors, or by spectacle wearers, but their optical quality is generally not good enough for prolonged use.

Although safety spectacles are commonly worn in laboratories and their use is strongly encouraged, they are not sealed to the face and so are not appropriate where there is a serious risk of eye injury from toxic or corrosive chemicals or from cryogens (e.g. where large volumes may be splashed onto the head and run down into the eyes).

2) GOGGLES

Goggles provide total protection to the eyes, though they are heavier and less convenient than safety spectacles. They may be worn over prescription spectacles. Unvented goggles offer far better protection than safety spectacles where there is a serious danger of chemical splash, but may be prone to misting up.

Double glazing or treated lenses alleviate this; directly or indirectly ventilated goggles are also available. However, directly ventilated goggles do not give good protection against ingress of chemicals, gases, and dust; indirectly ventilated goggles give protection against liquid ingress, but do not prevent entry of gases or vapours.

3) FACE SHIELDS

Face shields protect the whole face as well as the eyes, but do not fully enclose the eyes, so do not give protection against dusts and gases. They are comfortable to wear, not prone to misting and may be used with ordinary spectacles.

Dirty lenses impair vision, causing eye fatigue and leading to accidents. The plastic lenses of eye protectors should be wet cleaned to avoid scratching; scratched lenses should be replaced, as should face shields if they become crazed or brittle with age.

ISSUE OF SAFETY SPECTACLES

Safety spectacles and goggles should be issued on a personal basis and should be thoroughly cleaned before issue to someone else.

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